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nevernoahh:

twitter doodles that never made it here oop

6 days ago with 465 notes — via diverse-sf-fantasy, © nevernoahh



kissikissi:

Here’s another little addition to the Borrowers series.

6 days ago with 4,175 notes — via diverse-sf-fantasy, © kissikissi



charminglyantiquated:

a little love story about mermaids and tattoos

6 days ago with 162,659 notes — via corvincabbage, © charminglyantiquated



juliedillon:

This is an illustration I did for the August 2014 issue of Popular Science Magazine. The assignment was to show a scifi take on human aging in the future. I wanted to do something relatively positive, so I drew a lady whose life has been been prolonged through cybernetic enhancements and augmentation, so she gets to spend time with her great-great-great-great grandchildren. 
Thanks to AD Michelle Mruk!

juliedillon:

This is an illustration I did for the August 2014 issue of Popular Science Magazine. The assignment was to show a scifi take on human aging in the future. I wanted to do something relatively positive, so I drew a lady whose life has been been prolonged through cybernetic enhancements and augmentation, so she gets to spend time with her great-great-great-great grandchildren. 

Thanks to AD Michelle Mruk!

1 week ago with 19,536 notes — via thesuper-novas, © juliedillon



medievalpoc:

crowtoed submitted to medievalpoc:

This is Maria Christian, my former cast director at the Michigan Renaissance Festival as her character, Princess Isaade M’boukou. Maria’s been designing and wearing African-Elizabethan fusion garb to MiRF for decades, so she has a few different gowns and headpieces in rotation. In addition to her duties keeping the stage acts organized, as Isaade she acts as an impresario at the feasts, talks about West African traditions and folklore, and is much needed and treasured PoC representation on the cast.

1 week ago with 5,746 notes — via thesuper-novas, © medievalpoc



nonmodernist:

bigbangpress:

Here’s a picture from our first book, A Hero at the End of the World, written by Erin Claiborne (eleveninches) and illustrated by Jade Liebes (hydrae). The two guys in this photo are Ewan Mao and his former best friend Oliver Abrams.

As a teenager, Ewan was prophesied to save Britain from an evil tyrant — but chickened out at the last moment. Instead, his best friend Oliver ended up defeating the villain. Five years later, Oliver is a national hero while Ewan works at a coffee shop and still lives with his parents. But the two friends are unwillingly reunited when a magical cult targets Ewan in a plot to end the world.

A Hero at the End of the World is a hilarious and gripping combination of YA fantasy adventure, queer romance, and political satire. It will be published by Big Bang Press on November 11, and you can find out more on our website!

fantasy adventure, queer romance, and political satire - this book is everything i’ve ever wanted in my YA fantasy loving heart

1 week ago with 3,464 notes — via corvincabbage, © bigbangpress



yosilog:

its a little late but here’s @studiosalimbal #PinoyMagicalGirls . Ibong adarna theme because i suck at this

yosilog:

its a little late but here’s @studiosalimbal PinoyMagicalGirls . Ibong adarna theme because i suck at this

1 week ago with 122 notes — via diverse-sf-fantasy, © yosilog



medievalpoc:

prokopetz:

cleopatrasweave:

i drew a bunch of elves of color!!

This post reminds me of something that happened a few years back.

I once served as art director for a project where the illustration spec called for characters of a variety of races (in the real-world sense, not the Dungeons & Dragons sense - though the latter was involved as well).

We had one particular artist, tasked with drawing a series of elves, who didn’t quite seem to get what that meant. Their output was basically “white elf”, “another white elf”, “white elf with a tan”, “white elf looking a bit pale”, “yet another white elf”, etc.

When this was pointed out, they were like “oh, yeah, now I get it - I’ll totally fix that with my next piece”.

They proceeded to turn in a picture of a blue elf.

In the end, we had to provide specific quotas for specific levels of racial representation in order to get the point across. It all worked out in the end, but it’s stuck with me ever since that this artist examined the original spec, looked at our feedback, and came to the conclusion a blue elf was more plausible than a black one.

In conclusion: this is awesome.

Read that last paragraph as many times as you need to.

1 week ago with 70,815 notes — via cypsiman2



1 week ago with 105 notes — via afrofuturistaffair, © mustachepervert



theabsolutemag:

Unrest: An Adventure Game Set in Ancient India

Unrest is an unusual kind of game. It first caught my attention just because of the setting–fantasy India. Bhimra is a struggling country being destroyed in a drought and forced to make treaty with the neighboring Naga kingdom in order to survive. The Naga are, you guessed it, giant talking snakes who view the humans with suspicion and sometimes contempt, and rightly so as anti-Naga sentiment sweeps through the slums. Unrest makes you play from the perspective of several characters who stand in some way poised to affect the country’s future, whether as a princess scratching out a living in the slums, a peasant girl trying to free herself from an arranged marriage, or a weary Naga ambassador negotiating for her countrypeople. Countrysnakes.

1 week ago with 223 notes — via theabsolutemag